Records Manager 2.9.2

John Woodward has updated Records Manager extensively since we last mentioned it. Records Manager is MacOS X software that allows you to collect important records (such as bank statements or receipts) in a database and allow for easy addition of new records, easy access to existing records, and optional automatic backup of the database. Think of it as a replacement for a file cabinet but with easier filing and retrieval. You can optionally encrypt your records with 128-bit AES encryption to keep them secure. It costs $24 and requires Mac OS X 10.2.8.

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MemoryMiner’s Future Additions – GEDCOM Support

While checking the MemoryMiner Blog, I noticed that GroupSmarts, LLC, is adding some of the most requested features for MemoryMiner in the upcoming version 1.1 release:
* GEDCOM import
* Read embedded IPTC metadata (to automatically associate to people and places in MemoryMiner)
* Automatic upload to .Mac and (S)FTP servers (to make publishing easier)

They note that it should make genealogists happy, and I believe it will.

On a sidenote, MemoryMiner won a 2006 Macworld Best of Show award (that link will give you a good review of MemoryMiner).

Finally, John Fox of GroupSmarts, LLC, was interviewed in a Podcast at DuelBootRadio.lybsyn.com where he discusses what goes into MemoryMiner and how it came about (very detailed discussion).

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MemoryMiner 1.0.5

MemoryMiner 1.0.5 has been released by GroupSmarts, LLC. It’s a Mac OS X appliaction (Mac OS X 10.4.3+/Universal Binary) that allows you to use photos as “individual frames in a type of endless story board. The story elements are linked to each other by way of annotation layers identifying the people, places, dates and events captured in each frame. As links are made, it becomes easy and tremendously interesting to explore the threads which link people’s lives across time, place and shared experience.”

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MemoryMiner 1.04

MemoryMiner 1.04 is out, and it’s a very interesting piece of software. The developer’s do a much better job of describing it than I could: At its core, are a simple set of tools for treating photos (particularly rare, “pre-digital” photos) as individual frames in a type of endless story board. The story elements are linked to each other by way of annotation layers identifying the people, places, dates and events captured in each frame. As links are made, it becomes easy and tremendously interesting to explore the threads which link people’s lives across time, place and shared experience.

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